<b>Faculty Book Celebration speaker Sidonie Smith</b> argues that it's time to put aside "repetitive talk of crisis" and instead move forward with a new agenda for doctoral education that is adequate to the state of higher education, the state of the disciplines and the nature of future jobs in the profession.
Faculty Book Celebration speaker Sidonie Smith argues that it's time to put aside "repetitive talk of crisis" and instead move forward with a new agenda for doctoral education that is adequate to the state of higher education, the state of the disciplines and the nature of future jobs in the profession.

Readers have long sought to extend the pleasure of beloved books, says Amy Pawl, a scholar of children’s (and English) literature. In the most recent filmic addition to the Harry Potter canon, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," Pawl finds the promise of more and an audience eager for the next chapter.
Readers have long sought to extend the pleasure of beloved books, says Amy Pawl, a scholar of children’s (and English) literature. In the most recent filmic addition to the Harry Potter canon, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," Pawl finds the promise of more and an audience eager for the next chapter.

<b>Sowande' Mustakeem,</b> a scholar of the Atlantic slave trade, considers the redeeming strengths of Nate Parker's 2016 film <i>The Birth of a Nation</i>, whose controversies may have cost the film its shot at Oscar gold.
Sowande' Mustakeem, a scholar of the Atlantic slave trade, considers the redeeming strengths and teachable moments of Nate Parker's 2016 film The Birth of a Nation, whose controversies may have cost the film its shot at Oscar gold.



<i>Moonlight</i> is not a coming-out story, says <b>Jeffrey McCune</b>, associate professor of women, gender and sexuality studies and African & African-American studies. Rather, this tale is centered on intimacy and difference, as the characters challenge prevailing scripts about black masculinity.
Moonlight is not a coming-out story, says Jeffrey McCune, associate professor of women, gender and sexuality studies and African and African-American studies. Rather, this tale is centered on intimacy and difference, as the characters challenge prevailing scripts about black masculinity.