Readers have long sought to extend the pleasure of beloved books, says Amy Pawl, a scholar of children’s (and English) literature. In the most recent filmic addition to the Harry Potter canon, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," Pawl finds the promise of more and an audience eager for the next chapter.
Readers have long sought to extend the pleasure of beloved books, says Amy Pawl, a scholar of children’s (and English) literature. In the most recent filmic addition to the Harry Potter canon, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," Pawl finds the promise of more and an audience eager for the next chapter.

In this scene, Creole circus folk hero Juan Moreira engages in a knife fight with a store owner who refused to pay his debt. This was both a crowd-pleasing scene and the moment that launched Moreira into his life of crime. (Photo courtesy Instituto Nacional de Estudios de Teatro, Buenos Aires, Argentina)
For the late 19th-century denizens of Argentina and Uruguay’s Río de la Plata region, the greatest show on earth was the Creole circus. William Acree, a scholar of Latin American literature and culture and a Faculty Fellow in the Center for the Humanities, walks us through the phenomenon.
If Dadaist Raoul Hausmann's 1918 poster poem “fmsbw” has you feeling a little befuddled, that’s the point. The arrangement of letters and punctuation must be read within its media-historical context, says Kurt Beals. His current book project examines the influence of new media technologies on the artistic production of the German avant-gardes of the 20th century.
If Dadaist Raoul Hausmann's 1918 poster poem “fmsbw” has you feeling a little befuddled, that’s the point. The arrangement of letters and punctuation must be read within its media-historical context, says Kurt Beals.

When the Gran Chaco liquid separation plant opened in August 2015, it was touted as a "new chapter in the history of the petroleum business in Bolivia." Anthropologist <b>Bret Gustafson</b> looks beyond the capitalist triumph to examine the energy sector's impact on the area's people and environment.
When the Gran Chaco liquid separation plant opened in August 2015, it was touted as a "new chapter in the history of the petroleum business in Bolivia." Anthropologist Bret Gustafson looks beyond the capitalist triumph to examine the energy sector's impact on the area's people and environment.


UPCOMING EVENTS

December 7, 2016

February 7, 2017

February 9, 2017