Maxwell Smart, bumbling fictional spy of the 1960s tv show Get Smart, hold up his thumb and forefinger and says his catchphrase: "I missed it by that much."
When a person makes a mistake in logical reasoning, does it matter how close they come to the mark or is wrong just wrong? Philosopher Julia Staffel investigates the differences between slightly and highly irrational thinkers.

Between the two world wars, a new leftwing political movement took hold in Japan, driven partly by the Proletarian Film League, or Prokino. Film scholar <b>Diane Lewis'</b> book-in-progress, a social history of Prokino, maps its place in interwar Japan. Prokino's February 1932 issue of <i>Eiga kurabu</i> (Film Club) features an image of demonstrating female bus drivers from a film it planned to make called "Nobiyuku joseisen" (The Expanding Women's Front).
Between the two world wars, a new leftwing political movement took hold in Japan, driven partly by the Proletarian Film League, or Prokino. Film scholar Diane Lewis' book-in-progress, a social history of Prokino, maps its place in interwar Japan.

In her eponymous television show, "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" is a college drop-out who couldn't find her place on campus. So, why do scholars find the series so thought provoking? Why is "Buffy studies" a thing? Wendy Love Anderson unpacks the common ideals behind the show and academia.
Scholar Jonathan Fenderson uncovers the life story of the activist-editor of the most important monthly print platform for African-American intellectual culture in the 1960s–70s, Hoyt Fuller.


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