In her eponymous television show, "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" is a college drop-out who couldn't find her place on campus. So, why do scholars find the series so thought provoking? Why is "Buffy studies" a thing? Wendy Love Anderson unpacks the common ideals behind the show and academia.
Between the two world wars, a new leftwing political movement took hold in Japan, driven partly by the Proletarian Film League, or Prokino. Film scholar <b>Diane Lewis'</b> book-in-progress, a social history of Prokino, maps its place in interwar Japan. Prokino's February 1932 issue of <i>Eiga kurabu</i> (Film Club) features an image of demonstrating female bus drivers from a film it planned to make called "Nobiyuku joseisen" (The Expanding Women's Front).
Between the two world wars, a new leftwing political movement took hold in Japan, driven partly by the Proletarian Film League, or Prokino. Film scholar Diane Lewis' book-in-progress, a social history of Prokino, maps its place in interwar Japan.

Scholar Jonathan Fenderson uncovers the life story of the activist-editor of the most important monthly print platform for African-American intellectual culture in the 1960s–70s, Hoyt Fuller.


In a roundtable discussion, Jennifer Colten, Denise Ward-Brown and Michael Allen discuss their current exhibition, <i>Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place,</i> which reveals how the tangled web of social injustice, racial politics and neglect affected an African-American cemetery.
In a roundtable discussion, Jennifer Colten, Denise Ward-Brown and Michael Allen discuss their current exhibition, Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place, which reveals how the tangled web of social injustice, racial politics and neglect affected an African-American cemetery.

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